Algebraic inequalities by Vasile Cirtoaje

By Vasile Cirtoaje

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5 eV. 5 eV. 5 eV. 5 HO H* 1S eV. (3) (2pou; n=3) is a group of autodissociating states over which an average performed. ,........ 10 VI E N u > b v E u 1\ 10 10 '7 9 ........ II .. I -10 -II 10 I" " 10 _I 10 10! ··· 10 2 TorE(eV) b .. 2 (2) o~~~ represents a least squares fit to the experimental data. (3) For the mean energy distribution of ejected electrons , see Sect. 5. ) 1\ f"'o.... V i'. v 10 .... 9 ··· -JO 10 -IJ 10 _I 10 I 10 ' ··• ···· ·· 10 '6 N > b r-. ) . •. 0 eV]. diss() diss( ).

19 10 4 10 43 10 eV. Cross Section: Reference: E = 60 Takayanagi and Suzuki (1978) - 200 eV: Odiss(H*) exc 2 = oBOR se· Mean Energy of Reaction Products: Conunents: (1) 0exp is corrected from the values in Corrigan (196S) (see Takayanagi and Suzuki 1978). Below SO eV it is consistent with the two-state closecoupling calculations of Chung and Lin (1978), but the sum of o(a 3 t;) and o(c 3nu ) is a factor of 3 too large compared to the recent measurements by Khakoo and Trajmar (1986). 1S a Born- 0 c h kur-Rudge extrapolation of 0exp.

F/) u v 109 -10 10 -II 10 _I 10 ·· · ··· ··· ·· ·· I': ,, , ··· ·· E b . / · 108 ~ "> , ,, 10 16 , ,, N E u ,, , 10 17 b , -18 10 -19 10 ' 102 Tor E(eV) 10 4 10 29 (n>2) I Cross Section and Rate Coefficient: o. 56 x 10- 6 T- 1 • 5 exp(-Sn) (1. 32 Sn Vriens and Smeets (1980) Mean Energy of Ejected Electrons: 2" 2 1 '4 Eth ~ 4n 2 , E :$ E ~ 3 2" 3 2" expected to be high for n »1. figure. 30 Etho The cross section o:;A(n) is derived semiempirically and is based on a modified binary encounter Note: Eth Omidvar (1965) Reference: Comment: (E - Eth ), For n = 3, approximation.

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