Elementary physics for engineers; an elementary text book by J. Paley Yorke

By J. Paley Yorke

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Inch. If the liquid be D times as heavy as water bulk for bulk ii J 21 Properties of Liquids then the pressure at any point L feet below the surface will be D x L x 6-94 ozs. per square inch. On the metric system it is even simpler because 1 cubic centimetre of water weighs 1 gramme. Therefore the pressure per square centimetre at any point below the surface will be x grammes, where D L= L of the point in centimetres depth and D = the number On of times that the liquid is heavier than water. the metric system this will be the density in D grammes per cubic centimetre.

If r a sharp dividing line between the heavier salt solution and the lighter water. But if we leave them undisturbed we 35 Properties of Liquids n] very gradually some of the heavy have come to the top and some of the lighter water will have gone to the bottom and that eventually the liquids will become mixed. This gradual intermingling done apparently against the shall find that liquid will laws of gravity called diffusion. is more readily between gases and every gas can diffuse into Diffusion takes place than between liquids, this cannot be said of liquids.

Therefore the pressure per square centimetre at any point below the surface will be x grammes, where D L= L of the point in centimetres depth and D = the number On of times that the liquid is heavier than water. the metric system this will be the density in D grammes per cubic centimetre. Pressure on the sides of a vessel. Since at any given point the pressure is equal in all directions it follows that the pressure on the sides or walls of a vessel at any point is determined in exactly the same way as it would be for a point on a horizontal surface at the same depth.

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