Humanitarian Response Index 2008: Measuring Commitment to by Development Assistance Research Associates (DARA)

By Development Assistance Research Associates (DARA)

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Generosity, however, is not the only issue – it is also about how the money is distributed and how it is used. Simply providing funding generously without any engagement with operational actors or the government of the crisis affected country as to how it will be spent, or monitoring and oversight on the quality of programming is a less than adequate approach. Finding a balance is a challenge for all donors. Generosity of humanitarian assistance Donor Luxembourg Norway Sweden Ireland Netherlands Denmark Switzerland Finland Australia New Zealand United Kingdom Canada United States Belgium Spain Germany Greece taly France Japan Austria Portugal European Community Rank 1 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 N/A The Humanitarian Response Index 2008 19 The Humanitarian Response Index 2008 20 Table 4: Pillar 1 Rankings PILLAR 1: RESPONDING TO NEEDS Qualitative indicators based on the Questionnaire on Good Humanitarian Donorship Saving lives and maintaining dignity Impartiality Neutrality Independence 9 15 12 14 1 11 8 22 2 23 5 20 16 7 13 3 10 21 17 4 6 18 19 13 10 11 15 2 17 18 23 1 22 5 19 8 3 16 7 12 9 20 4 6 14 21 14 15 17 8 12 10 20 23 4 19 2 18 11 7 9 5 6 21 13 3 1 16 22 Reallocation of funds from other Funding needs crises assessments Timely funding Funding in proportion to need Donor capacity for informed decisionmaking 1 12 22 13 9 17 21 20 8 23 7 18 15 3 11 2 10 19 16 6 5 14 4 6 21 9 8 5 11 18 20 15 23 2 16 13 17 7 19 4 22 12 1 3 10 14 5 N/A 10 7 14 1 17 15 13 N/A 18 12 6 N/A 9 N/A 11 N/A 16 4 8 3 2 Commitment to on-going crises 13 20 21 4 10 2 5 16 6 17 1 12 14 11 8 19 22 23 14 3 9 7 18 Donor Australia Austria Belgium Canada Denmark European Commission Finland France Germany Greece Ireland Italy Japan Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Norway Portugal Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States 11 19 9 10 13 12 2 23 16 22 4 20 15 8 6 3 5 21 14 7 1 18 17 2 22 15 11 9 18 16 14 19 20 4 21 10 12 7 8 3 23 17 1 5 6 13 1 21 10 17 3 16 11 20 18 22 4 19 12 14 8 6 7 23 15 5 2 9 13 PILLAR 1: RESPONDING TO NEEDS Quantitative Indicators Funding to crisis countries with historical ties and geographical proximity Funding to forgotten emergencies and those with low media coverage Timely funding to complex emergencies with UN appeals Timely funding to onset disasters and IFRC emergency appeals 11 14 1 15 21 10 7 1 13 20 9 17 22 3 12 18 8 N/A 19 6 4 5 16 7 22 20 11 5 16 13 15 19 10 1 21 14 8 6 17 4 N/A 9 1 18 3 12 12 19 18 8 2 16 4 11 13 22 15 3 9 20 6 5 21 N/A 1 10 14 7 17 Generosity of humanitarian assistance Distribution of funding relative to ECHO's Crisis and Vulnerability Indices Sectoral distribution of funding through UN appeals 9 21 14 11 6 N/A 8 19 16 17 4 18 20 1 5 12 1 22 15 3 7 10 13 2 1 3 4 22 6 9 10 13 14 11 12 5 18 16 15 19 23 7 20 21 17 8 9 1 4 17 8 7 12 10 6 18 19 13 11 20 5 15 16 N/A 14 21 22 1 1 Donor Australia Austria Belgium Canada Denmark European Commission Finland France Germany Greece Ireland Italy Japan Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Norway Portugal Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States 21 2 13 10 11 20 5 12 17 6 8 7 22 3 15 16 9 N/A 14 1 4 18 19 Main Sources: OCHA FTS, OECD/DAC, the World Bank, IFRC, the Federal Reserve, ECHO, Alertnet Addressing this is therefore an outstanding challenge for donors, in particular in conflicts and politicised complex emergencies.

However, it also indicates that funding and support for these initiatives vary considerably between donors and across crises. Furthermore, more than just increased funding is required if donors wish to effectively strengthen local capacity to prepare, mitigate and respond to crises; efforts should address all levels from the community up, and international tools and mechanism should be adapted to the local context, including, for example, the challenges posed by weak and failed states. Similarly, to systematically promote GHD Principle 9, donors may need to further review the relationship between their humanitarian and development policies, for example aligning the first of these with initiatives such as the Paris Declaration and the MDGs, without losing sight of the need to maintain the aims, objectives and independence of humanitarian action.

23 Although humanitarian assistance has traditionally been isolated from development cooperation at both strategic and operational levels both sectors could benefit from a rethink as to how the two could work together more closely. An encouraging sign is that many donors have begun to frame their humanitarian action policies within a broader development context that includes conflict prevention, conflict management, conflict reduction, peace-building, and post-conflict rehabilitation and recovery programmes.

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